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Extension based information for nuisance wildlife control

Putting University research to use

The Wildlife Damage Management Program allows management experts to address numerous wildlife damage concerns, and coordinate research projects with an education and information dissemination program that reaches extension specialists, growers, nurserymen, and homeowners throughout New York State and the northeast.

Northeast wildlife damage management cooperative creates 13 state collaboration    -  State universities work together to serve northeast

The WDM Coop, through a unique partnership between state and federal wildlife agencies and universities in the Northeast, brings focus to these issues.  The Coop promotes consistent, multi-state approaches to help resolve wildlife damage concerns for the stakeholders of the region and the nation.

Internet Center for wildlife damage management

National resource for wildlife damage management information

The Internet Center for Wildlife Damage Management (ICWDM) attempts to consolidate existing and future information on integrated pest management (IPM) in wildlife damage management. Its goal is to increase adoption of IPM practices in wildlife damage management by centralizing resources.

Today's Wildlife Problems

People value wildlife for a wide range of reasons. Protection, enhancement, consumption, preservation and aesthetics all have their proponents. Regardless of one's primary philosophy, there tends to be general agreement that management of damage is necessary when too many of a particular species create negative economic impacts or health and safety concerns. Several years ago, scientists at Cornell University, USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, and the New York State Departments of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and Agriculture & Markets initiated a cooperative program aimed at developing a comprehensive understanding of wildlife damage problems and management options in New York State. Past efforts have addressed a variety of problems caused by rodents, birds, squirrels, Canada geese, beaver, and white-tailed deer. Funding and collaboration among the participating agencies allows expanded efforts, principally in deer management, but also targeting other damage problems.

Cornell collaborative web publishing project

We use MS SharePoint for our web collaboration platform running on Windows 2003 and IIS server. Our development technology is based on using industry standard XML to generate semantic schemas of wildlife damage information. Asp.net is the binding technology that lets us write to the database or to the operating system. If you would like to know more about our project, please contact Raj Smith.